Environmental Shepherds’ Meeting

Sunday, February 24
after 10am Eucharist

Trinity Environmental Shepherds invites members of the parish to join us to provide input on our mission and, priorities and to help set the agenda going forward. We will meet in the Library.

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Lord God of the Universe, in giving us dominion over things on Earth, you made us fellow workers in your creation: Give us wisdom and reverence so to use the resources of nature, that no one may suffer from our abuse of them, and that generations yet to come may continue to praise you for your bounty…
— Collect for the Conservation of Natural Resources, Book of Common Prayer

Seventh Sunday after Epiphany

O Lord, you have taught us that without love whatever we do is worth nothing: Send your Holy Spirit and pour into our hearts your greatest gift, which is love, the true bond of peace and of all virtue, without which whoever lives is accounted dead before you. Grant this for the sake of your only Son Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.
— Collect for the Seventh Sunday after Epiphany
 
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Detail of St. Michael’s Copenhagen altarpiece by Henrik Olrik (1830-1890) depicting the “Discourse of the Plains” or “Sermon on the Mount”.

Detail of St. Michael’s Copenhagen altarpiece by Henrik Olrik (1830-1890) depicting the “Discourse of the Plains” or “Sermon on the Mount”.

Worship Leaders

 

8am Rite I

Homilist
The Rev. Paul Jeanes III

Reader & Intercessor
Nina Kola

Chalicist
Ann Zultner  

Acolyte
Amelia Willson

Ushers
Trey Delaney
Costa Papastephanou
Dottie Werner

Prayer Partner
Becky Reynolds

10am Rite II

Homilist
The Rev. Paul Jeanes III

Reader
Mike Panzarella

Intercessor
Kathy Rohrer

Chalicists
Dr. Roberta Fiske-Rusciano
Grant Fraser
Lucia Huebner
Michael Kraus

Acolytes
Lucia Huebner
Lily Leonard

Crucifer
Juliet Richardson

Ushers
Wendell Collins
Tom Cooper
Helen Davies
Noreen Duncan
Bill Schowalter

Audio
Marc Sibilia

5pm Evensong

Reader
Bucky Brown

Acolyte
Aleksandra Zasada
Micah Cronin

One Table Volunteers

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We had a wonderful One Table Café in January and February featuring both the Rev. William Carter III in January and Sarah Steward the COO of HomeFront in February.

One Table Café couldn’t take place without the help of volunteers. February marked the 70th dinner in our eight year history and our volunteers and staff have performed miracles serving over 8,500 meals.

We are also indebted to the 24 Princeton restaurants that have provided food. We tip our hats to all of them and thank them for their generosity.

It takes a lot of Trinity volunteers and staff to make this ministry a success and we are blessed to have the Rev. Paul Jeanes as our leader and as our inspiration for making One Table Café such a popular community restaurant.

If you want to sign up to be a volunteer please email:

One Table Café is on the third Friday of the month.  

 

THANK YOU FOR
YOUR GOOD WORK

 

Set-up Team

Alison Roth, Sally Marucca, Kim and Brianna Lee, Lisa Schmid

Trinity Staff Helpers

Br. Chris McNabb, Enrico Santos Ramirez, Roberto Melgoza ,Hannah Johnson, Elly Matsil 

Kitchen & Server Crew, Cleanup Crew, Greeters & Reservation Volunteers

Rev. Paul Jeanes, Rev. Louise Kingston, Martha Lashbrook, Ann Zultner,  Connie White, Wendy Heiser, Yvonne DeCarolis, Tracey Knerr, Ruth Thorton,  Ira Lackey, Melissa Scott, Janet Moore, Bill Vogt, Tom Scott, Carlos Brecknell, Leslie Brecknell, Betsy Hoover, Fred Kelly, Katie Hawn, Marco Ramirez, P.A. Tippett, Alix Gerry,  Ed and Regina Hoag, Diane Paulsell, Guy Pierson, Joan Reilly, Heidi Currier, Lynne and Van Davis, Julie Denny, Phil Unetic, Eric and Ellie Chesebrough, Robbie Ellsworth, Dan Haughton, Debbie Minch. We are also thankful to the Girl Scout Troops that helped out at our January dinner. 

A Great Cloud of Witnesses

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Last week, Fr. Paul and I had the opportunity to travel to General Theological Seminary, in New York City, to hear former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams share two lectures about his life as a Christian.  What a powerful witness!  Even as we move forward as Anglican Communion with various disagreements and differences, it was a gift to hear how we are united in our faith in Jesus Christ!  The Archbishop shared about key influences in his life, including Mother Kara’s favorite theologian Karl Barth and one of my own spiritual heroes and former Kentuckian, Thomas Merton.  Surely, we are surrounded by a great cloud of witnesses who light our path home to God. The Archbishop also encouraged us to engage with our local congregations as we seek to serve our world.

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Rowan Williams  [Photos: Tommy Dillon]

Rowan Williams [Photos: Tommy Dillon]

In that spirit, Trinity Church continues to forge a partnership with St. Michael’s Church in Trenton.  On President’s Day, I had the opportunity to lead their annual service of Commemoration for General George Washington. In preparation for that service, I did a little research and found out the following about St. Michael’s: 

When George Washington and the Continental army surprised the Hessians on December 26, 1776, some of the fighting of the Battle of Trenton happened in St. Michael’s church yard.   There was hand to hand combat with swords, muskets, and bayonets on church grounds.  Later in the war, the church was used by George Washington’s Continental Army as a hospital…

In 1801, the Fifth General Convention of the Episcopal Church met at St. Michael’s.  One of the most significant actions of this convention was the adoption the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion… Another historical event at St. Michael’s was the Diocesan Convention of August 1815, where The Rev. John Cross was elected the first Episcopal Bishop of New Jersey.

 In 1843, the church added the Warren Street frontage. The Gothic Revival Style of the building façade resembles a castle. The principal sanctuary of St. Michael’s was renovated to resemble Lambeth Palace, the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury in England. St. Michael’s had two turrets and a bell tower. The turrets and towers remain, but the bell tower is no longer standing. Standing across the street on Warren looking up at the front of the church, you will see the likeness of Lambeth Palace. [Source]

Lambeth Palace

Lambeth Palace

St. Michael’s Church, Trenton

St. Michael’s Church, Trenton

Whether it’s their role in the American Revolution, the early foundations of the Episcopal Church and our Diocese, or their place in the greater Anglican Communion, we’re partnering with a congregation that has profound importance in the story of our nation and our church!  I’m so grateful to Fr. Paul and our Vestry for their decision to minister alongside the people of St. Michael’s Church!

In peace,

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Br. Chris McNabb, OSF
Curate

Sonia Waters: Addiction and Pastoral Care

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Sunday, February 17, 2019 at 9am
in Pierce-Bishop Hall

The Rev. Dr. Sonia Waters, Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary, will lead our Adult Forum by addressing the treatment of addiction holistically as both a spiritual and a pathological condition 

Substance addictions present a unique set of challenges for pastoral care. Dr. Waters weaves together personal stories, research, and theological reflection to offer helpful tools for ministers, counselors, chaplains, and anyone else called to care pastorally for those struggling with addiction. 

She uses the story of the Gerasene demoniac in Mark’s Gospel to reframe addiction as a “soul-sickness” that arises from a legion of individual and social vulnerabilities. She includes pastoral reflections on oppression, the War on Drugs, trauma, guilt, discipleship, and identity.

For a taste of what to expect, check out the Rev. Drs. Kara Slade and Sonia Waters in their October 31, 2018 webinar for the Society of Scholar Priests:

Sixth Sunday after Epiphany

O God, the strength of all who put their trust in you: Mercifully accept our prayers; and because in our weakness we can do nothing good without you, give us the help of your grace, that in keeping your commandments we may please you both in will and deed; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.
— Collect for the Sixth Sunday after Epiphany
 
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The Eight Beatitudes , Hendrick Goltzius, c. 1578

The Eight Beatitudes, Hendrick Goltzius, c. 1578


Worship Leaders

 

8am Rite I

Homilist
The Rev. Canon Jeremy Davies

Reader & Intercessor
Tracey Knerr

Chalicist
Guy Pierson  

Acolyte
Tracey Knerr

Ushers
Art Eng
Nina Kola
Ed Metcalf

Prayer Partner
Shirley Pietrucha

10am Rite II

Homilist
The Rev. Canon Jeremy Davies

Reader
Mike Panzarella

Intercessor
Steve Bechtler

Chalicists
Brian Duane
Maureen McCormick
Jim Phillips
Phil Unetic

Acolytes
Maureen McCormick
Phil Unetic

Crucifer
Zbigniew Zasada

Ushers
Stephanie Benjamin
Matthew Benjamin
Caswell Cooke
Robert Fraser
Pegi Stengel

Audio
Mike Deverell

Prayer Partner
Bill Haynes

5pm Evensong

Reader
Linda Twining

Acolyte
Lily Leonard

Guest Writer: To Be an Acolyte

Dear friends,

After a wonderful conversation with Amelia Willson, I asked her to write a piece for the ePISTLE about her experience as an acolyte. I have two ulterior motives for this. The first is that I hope others who might be interested in serving as an acolyte might read this and be motivated to take the next step. It truly is a wonderful way to serve Christ and his church. The second is that I hope this article will be the first in an ongoing occasional series in which parishioners talk about their own ministries at Trinity and how their involvement draws them closer to Christ. Because in the end, that’s what we’re about. 

Yours faithfully in Christ,

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The Rev. Dr. Kara N. Slade
Associate Rector

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To Be an Acolyte

Amelia Wilson

I arrive early—a half hour before the service, and in an empty sacristy I choose a cassock and pull it on.  With my back to the pews as I light the tall candles of the high altar, I can hear people making their way to their usual pews.  By the time I’ve finished, the organist has arrived and begun to warm up. Beautiful tones fill the once quiet space.  After lighting the last candles, I head up the aisle, past someone setting the Eucharistic table, a priest or two dashing about, and the ushers pinning flowers to their lapels.  We all greet each other, pleased to see familiar faces and knowing we are all doing our special part in the day’s service.  As acolyte, I am one among them.

I chat with ushers while I wait.  The church fills, and the priests arrive.  The first notes of the opening hymn are struck, and I take up the crucifix, look once to note everyone is ready, and begin my small but sacred part in a beautiful procession for the greatest celebration known to man.  In an instant and for all of us, the mood has gone from happy anticipation to solemn and purposeful. 

An acolyte does many jobs during the service.  I take the plate offerings from the ushers, assist the priest preparing for the Eucharist, and serve as chalice bearer.  All the while I am ever aware that I am surrounded by people I know and love, the priests dedicated to us and their passion to serve Christ, and the sacred mission we share. At the end, I think about all the people I saw that day. I think about the gospel’s message and the homily.  Now the church is empty again.  The energy and enthusiasm are gone with those who came to celebrate Christ, priests and parishioners alike.  It is done and it was all good, and I was a part of it.

Being an acolyte is about being part of the Church’s heartbeat—having a place in the great goings-on.

This is how it feels to be an acolyte.  I am trusted with meaningful tasks, honored to be shoulder to shoulder with priests and all those who work at each service, and thanked for my contributions.  Being an acolyte is about being part of the Church’s heartbeat—having a place in the great goings-on.  It is an honor that I did not earn except to volunteer when I was needed.  But I have my place now, among so many people whom I admire and who serve in big and small ways.  We all pull together and the service becomes a living testament to each other and to God, and the acolyte is there helping to make it happen.  In its own way and for me, it is thrilling.